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EMMENT MUTONGA CASE
CASE INFORMATION
NAME: Emment Mutonga
NATIONALITY: Zambian
BORN: Zambia [Africa] More information on Zambia
ABOUT EMMENT: Emment: Emment has turned to God in the hope that he might find peace and hope. He is a fantastic artist and writes well in English. Emment is the only child in his family and both his biological parents died when he was very young. He is now ten years on death row riding an emotional roller-coaster without any end in site.
ARRESTED: 1994
CHARGE: Robbery. Emment claims that he purchased a computer in the process of setting up his own small business but the Zambian authorities alleged that it was stolen goods.
SENTENCE: Death [Emment did not have any money to pay for a lawyer at his trial.]
PRISON: Mukobeko Maximum Security Prison
PRISON CONDITIONS: Prison conditions are as you might expect, below the standards of western prisons. The Prison is not able to provide nutritious food or basic supplies such as; soap, toothpaste, toiletries or medicine. Prisoners are fed porridge and one cup of boiled beans once a day.

Death Row: Prisoners under sentence of death -- "condemned prisoners" -- are detained at the Mukobeko maximum security prison near Kabwe, 100 km north of the capital, Lusaka. The "condemned section" of the prison was originally built to house 48 prisoners. There are now more than 200 in the same cells. Some prisoners are detained on death row for many years. Some have been under sentence of death for over 25 years. The death penalty is in violation of the preamble to the Constitution, which declares Zambia a Christian nation.

The cells: These are arranged on either side of a yard with 24 cells on two levels on either side. The cells are approximately three metres by two metres in size. Some of them hold six people. The prisoners are locked in their cells between 4.00 pm and 6.30 am. There are reports of a number of cases of tuberculosis, as well as other diseases within the prison. There is virtually no access to medical care. The prisoners all wear a form of prison uniform which, in some cases, consists of rags of material crudely stitched together.

MAIL ADDRESS: Mail Address: Emment Mutonga
Mukobeko Maximum Security Prison
Condemned Section
P.O. Box 80915
Kabwe, ZAMBIA
Central Africa
FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Emment has very little financial support and would appreciate any assistance possible. You should write to Emment and then seek his instruction on the best way to support him.
CURRENT CASE STATUS: Emment has not yet appeared before the Supreme Court of Zambia to pass the final verdict. He vehemently maintains his innocence. He has no legal support quite simply because he has no funds to pay for it.
HOW CAN YOU HELP: Emment would like to thank those who are writing to him and supporting him. He appreciates the international community whole heartily for their support and of course, thanks go to Kay Danes and all the team at Foreign Prisoner Support Service for setting up such a terrific web service!

Emment's clothing needs and sizes are listed below if anyone can help Emment with these items;

  • Shirt size: L or XL
  • Pants/ shorts size: 36
  • Shoe/sock size: 10
  • Undergarments: size 32-34
  • T-shirt: XL
  • Track suit size: 36 (or XL)
  • Pyjamas (XL)
  • Warm jumpers (XL)
  • bed sheets or singles
  • Canvass type bag to keep his personal belongings secure

You may write letters to Emment.

    Emment Mutonga
    Mukobeko Maximum Security Prison
    Condemned Section
    P.O. Box 80915
    Kabwe, ZAMBIA
    Central Africa
Your kindness and compassion when you offer words of encouragement in a simple card or letter to a prisoner can make a difference. Prison mail is not like ordinary mail. There are often delays when writing to prisoners because each letter must be censored before it is delivered. Please be patient. Some prisoners have very limited resources and can't afford the stamps and/or writing material.

Rules when writing to a Prisoner:

    1. Always be polite. Your aim is to help a prisoner, not to relieve your own feelings. Governments don't respond to abusive or condemnatory letters (however well deserved).
    2. Always write your letters on the basis that the government concerned is open to reason and discussion.
    3. Show respect for the country's constitution and judicial procedures, and to demonstrate an understanding of current difficulties. This will give more scope to point out ways in which the human rights situation can be improved.
    4. If you wish to write an appeal, be clear in what you are requesting. You should never make 'demands' on Governments.
    5. Never use political jargon or profanity. Don't give the impression that you are writing because you are ideologically or politically opposed to the government in question.
    6. All letters are subject to censorship by authorities so please do not write anything that will offend anyone.

Tips for writing

In your first letter, tell a little background about yourself - your interests and hobbies, things like that. Avoid sharing too much personal information. Prisoners are happy to hear from you and are looking for words of encouragement. You might respond to something they have written, such as a love for the outdoors or some other area of interest.
If you don't receive a reply right away, be patient. Mail moves more slowly behind prison walls. These prisoners are anxiously awaiting contact from the outside world. If you don't get an immediate reply, be assured that it is not because they are not trying to communicate with you.
Be sure both your return and to address are legible. Always print your name and address neatly on the envelope and include it again in the body of the letter in case something happens to the envelope. Put the prisoners' name on each sheet of paper or the back of any photos that you enclose - this ensures that pages won't get lost when the mail is opened.
Birthdays can be a lonely time. If you don't have time for a lengthy correspondence, remembering a prisoner on this particular day can have a tremendous impact.
Greeting cards can be a good way to make initial contact. There are so many friendship-type cards available just to say "hello" to the prisoner. This can take the pressure off of you worrying about what to write that first time.
You might want to include a photograph of yourself so the prisoner has a "face" to put with the name. Obviously, many of the prisoners are forthright in stating they are looking for relationships, but others are simply looking for a friend with whom they can correspond. A photo would be a nice gesture of friendship.
Do NOT include gifts, information about other inmates or any other unauthorized items. This would create problems for the prisoners. Check with the inmate you are writing to before sending any items. Your letter means more to them than any gift you might want to send them.
Be open and honest in your correspondence but stay level-headed and always remember that these prisoners are human beings. They are not novelty toys. They are people and should be treated with respect and courtesy regardless of what they are incarcerated for.

ZAMBIA MISSION: You can also contact the following Minister who visits Emment on a regular basis. PASTOR KWACHA MWULA (PRISON FELLOWSHIP ZAMBIA) LUSAKA CARE GROUP P.O. BOX 35538 LUSAKA - ZAMBIA Email: pastorkwachamvula2005@yahoo.com
LINKS: Emment has not yet appeared before the Supreme Court of Zambia to pass the final verdict. He vehemently maintains his innocence. He has no legal support quite simply because he has no funds to pay for it.
FREEDOM IS A RIGHT OF ALL HUMAN BEINGS IN A WORLD WHERE LIFE IS VALUED AND PEACE MAY FINALLY BE A POSSABILITY
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